So I’ve finished work, I no longer claim guardianship over Tortuguero’s dinosaurs. I miss the place already. 
It’s quite odd leaving the comforts of base and having to remember to eat again. I haven’t had rice for three days! Turns out I’ve developed a coffee affliction also, CR’s the place for it. 
I’ll spend the rest of this week developing further affairs with Costa Rica’s finest offers; Snorkellin’ and Rumin’. 
p.s. Would love it Central Americans would stop trying to sneak meat into my meals. thaaaannxx. 

So I’ve finished work, I no longer claim guardianship over Tortuguero’s dinosaurs. I miss the place already. 

It’s quite odd leaving the comforts of base and having to remember to eat again. I haven’t had rice for three days! Turns out I’ve developed a coffee affliction also, CR’s the place for it. 

I’ll spend the rest of this week developing further affairs with Costa Rica’s finest offers; Snorkellin’ and Rumin’. 

p.s. Would love it Central Americans would stop trying to sneak meat into my meals. thaaaannxx. 

Photo tagged as: costa_rica puerto_viejo
Black Vulture (Coragyps atratus) 
Loves abit of turtle they do! A lot of the tourist here worry about the vultures eating hatchlings, but they’re not to keen on considering the problems they cause by touching hatchlings and paying for a guide to dig up a nest early. The odds are already staked high against them, minimal impact is the key.
Tips for low impact hatchling hunting:
1. Excavating nests early can be incredibly damaging. Hatchlings rely on environmental cues to give them the best fighting chance of safely getting to the sea and surviving after that. They will emerge when fully prepared. 
2. Hatchlings need to exercise their swimming muscles by walking down the beach to the waves themselves. “Helping” a turtle to the sea is doing exactly the contrary and will leave it weak in the sea. 
3. Take pictures (No flash!) but stand back, hatchlings are fast and don’t need human bodies as an extra obstacle on the beach.
4. Do not breach beach rules. Stay off the beach during the night, and use only red lights minimally during turtle tours etc by well trained guides.
Let nature do its thing, it’s most glorious that way.

Black Vulture (Coragyps atratus) 

Loves abit of turtle they do! A lot of the tourist here worry about the vultures eating hatchlings, but they’re not to keen on considering the problems they cause by touching hatchlings and paying for a guide to dig up a nest early. The odds are already staked high against them, minimal impact is the key.

Tips for low impact hatchling hunting:

1. Excavating nests early can be incredibly damaging. Hatchlings rely on environmental cues to give them the best fighting chance of safely getting to the sea and surviving after that. They will emerge when fully prepared. 

2. Hatchlings need to exercise their swimming muscles by walking down the beach to the waves themselves. “Helping” a turtle to the sea is doing exactly the contrary and will leave it weak in the sea. 

3. Take pictures (No flash!) but stand back, hatchlings are fast and don’t need human bodies as an extra obstacle on the beach.

4. Do not breach beach rules. Stay off the beach during the night, and use only red lights minimally during turtle tours etc by well trained guides.

Let nature do its thing, it’s most glorious that way.

Photo tagged as: vulture hatchlings turtle costa_rica conservation

photojojo:

Dreamy underwater photography by Micah Camara.

via Photodonuts.

Just had to reblog.

In other news, Hawksbill nested last night :) Egg’s poached this morning :(

Video tagged as: reblog - Reblog from photojojo
Passerini’s Tanager (Ramphocelis passerinii)

Passerini’s Tanager (Ramphocelis passerinii)

Photo tagged as:
take-nothing-but-photos:

 
Shark massacre reported in Colombian waters
 
 
Environmental authorities say up to 2,000 hammerhead, Galápagos and whale sharks were slaughtered for their fins
Colombian environmental authorities have reported a huge shark massacre in the Malpelo wildlife sanctuary in Colombia’s Pacific waters, where as many as 2,000 hammerhead, Galápagos and silky sharks may have been slaughtered for their fins.
Sandra Bessudo, the Colombian president’s top adviser on environmental issues, said a team of divers who were studying sharks in the region reported the mass killing in the waters surrounding the rock-island known as Malpelo, some 500 kilometres from the mainland.
“I received a report, which is really unbelievable, from one of the divers who came from Russia to observe the large concentrations of sharks in Malpelo. They saw a large number of fishing trawlers entering the zone illegally,” Bessudo said. The divers counted a total of 10 fishing boats, which all were flying the Costa Rican flag.
“When the divers dove, they started finding a large number of animalswithout their fins. They didn’t see any alive,” she said. One of the divers provided a video that shows the finless bodies of dead sharks on the ocean floor.

The fact that this particular incident happened in “protected waters” is what’s getting me angry about this story. Marine Conservation organisations have been working incredibly hard over the past twenty years to make it clear to governments that it’s now or never for Marine ecosystems. And now those fruits are beginning to appear more often in the form of Offshore protected areas, but what’s the use if they’re not actively being protected?
Shark finning in Costa Rica is rife, the Taiwanese mafia who supposedly dominate the industry in central america muscle their way through Costa Rica’s disgracefully lax laws. They either illegally land their fins detached from the bodies, in heavily guarded private docks in the middle of night, or simply land the fins in  Nicaragua and transport them by land over the border (equally ilegal and often barbarically the fins are left attached only to the spine).
Long line fishing vessels in CR waters on average haul 200-300 sharks worth of fins per 10 days at sea. And this is continuous. They don’t have a chance. Here’s Gordon Ramsay investigating earlier this year.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lvyta4JeTPQ

take-nothing-but-photos:

Shark massacre reported in Colombian waters

 


Environmental authorities say up to 2,000 hammerhead, Galápagos and whale sharks were slaughtered for their fins

Colombian environmental authorities have reported a huge shark massacre in the Malpelo wildlife sanctuary in Colombia’s Pacific waters, where as many as 2,000 hammerhead, Galápagos and silky sharks may have been slaughtered for their fins.

Sandra Bessudo, the Colombian president’s top adviser on environmental issues, said a team of divers who were studying sharks in the region reported the mass killing in the waters surrounding the rock-island known as Malpelo, some 500 kilometres from the mainland.

“I received a report, which is really unbelievable, from one of the divers who came from Russia to observe the large concentrations of sharks in Malpelo. They saw a large number of fishing trawlers entering the zone illegally,” Bessudo said. The divers counted a total of 10 fishing boats, which all were flying the Costa Rican flag.

“When the divers dove, they started finding a large number of animalswithout their fins. They didn’t see any alive,” she said. One of the divers provided a video that shows the finless bodies of dead sharks on the ocean floor.

The fact that this particular incident happened in “protected waters” is what’s getting me angry about this story. Marine Conservation organisations have been working incredibly hard over the past twenty years to make it clear to governments that it’s now or never for Marine ecosystems. And now those fruits are beginning to appear more often in the form of Offshore protected areas, but what’s the use if they’re not actively being protected?

Shark finning in Costa Rica is rife, the Taiwanese mafia who supposedly dominate the industry in central america muscle their way through Costa Rica’s disgracefully lax laws. They either illegally land their fins detached from the bodies, in heavily guarded private docks in the middle of night, or simply land the fins in  Nicaragua and transport them by land over the border (equally ilegal and often barbarically the fins are left attached only to the spine).

Long line fishing vessels in CR waters on average haul 200-300 sharks worth of fins per 10 days at sea. And this is continuous. They don’t have a chance. Here’s Gordon Ramsay investigating earlier this year.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lvyta4JeTPQ

Photo tagged as: reblog - Reblog from take-nothing-but-photos
Doing a spot of modelling last night for my friend the Beartographer. Björn Johansson http://galagophotography.com (please credit!)
(NB: Björn is Swedish for ‘Bear’)

Doing a spot of modelling last night for my friend the Beartographer. Björn Johansson http://galagophotography.com (please credit!)

(NB: Björn is Swedish for ‘Bear’)

Photo tagged as: photography costa_rica

A recent WWF campaign is strikingly similar to my girl Spadge’s bachelors work. More of her talented things-that-look-beautiful endeavours on spadeuk.com

Video tagged as:
A Northern Cat-Eyed Snake (Leptodeira septentrionalis) 
Photo by Björn Johansson/galagophotography.com

A Northern Cat-Eyed Snake (Leptodeira septentrionalis) 

Photo by Björn Johansson/galagophotography.com

Photo tagged as: costa_rica snake handling northern_cat_eyed_snake
a very shy Black Wood Turtle (Rhinoclemmys funerea).

a very shy Black Wood Turtle (Rhinoclemmys funerea).

Photo tagged as: turtle costa_rica conservation

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